Living with disabilities and Mental health Guest Blog by Carol Anne


Hi everyone. my name is Carol Anne. 
I am an alter in a dissociative system. For those of you who don’t know what that means, basically it means I share my body with others, alter personalities, I am dissociative, I have what is known as DID – dissociative identity disorder, Which begins from early trauma, severe child abuse in my case.

D.I.D – Dissociative Identity Disorder is described on the MIND mental health charity website as-
Dissociative identity disorder (DID)Dissociative identity disorder used to be called ‘multiple personality disorder’.

  • If you have dissociative identity disorder you will experience severe changes in your identity. 
  • Different aspects of your identity may be in control of your behaviour and thoughts at different times.
  • Each of your identity states may have different patterns of thinking and relating to the world.Your identity states may come across as different ages and genders.
  • You may feel you have one ‘main’ part of your identity that feels most like ‘you’ – some people call this a host identity.
  • The different parts of your identity may have memories or experiences that conflict with each other.
  • Some people call these different parts of your identity ‘alters’ or ‘parts’.You might not have control over when different parts of your identity take over.
  • You may suffer from amnesia which means you don’t remember what happens when another part of your identity is in control.

Our body is 37, but I am 19. I am a protector salter. I am what is known an an ANP -apparently normal part.

Even though my name is Carol Anne, I cannot go by that name in real life, I have to use our bodys name of Shirley, because our family don’t accept our diagnosis, they are in denial about it.

I am from Ireland.

I am also blind. I have been blind since I was born. I was born 13 weeks premature. The blindness was caused by the backs of my eyes not being developed properly. I don’t mind being blind, you get used to coping without sight, when you’ve never had it you don’t miss it. I have a wonderful guide dog named Nitro.

He’s six years old and a cross breed between a lab and a golden retriever.He is my world.
Living with DID is hard. Every day I face triggers, memories, flashbacks, emotional overwhelm. Every day I struggle but I keep going and if you met me in person you’d probably never know we are a we unless you knew what you were looking for.

There are many personalities in here in this body with me. Young children, teens, and adults. We all make up the whole of Shirley, who is the host and our birth name.

If you’d like to know more please follow our blog, I blog about life, therapy, and living with disabilities and mental illness.

Thanks for reading,

Carol Anne.

www.therapybits.com
Shirley1980@aircom.net
Carol-Anne is happy to be contacted and loves making new friends!



UK LINKS ONLY! 

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20 thoughts on “Living with disabilities and Mental health Guest Blog by Carol Anne

  1. Hi 🙂 I did know about DID and I also have a young acquaintance (they are 17 years-old) who lives with it. However, your post has left me absolutely stunned, and deeply moved. I am lost for other words right now, besides sending you a big warm hug and all my best and sweetest wishes to you. Take much care, all of you, dear ❤ !!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. By the way, Carol Anne, do you think it would be right if I reblogged this post in my own blog, as well as Sooz have done? … (My blog is to a great extent about visual arts, and so, it displays many paintings and photographs, but it also has poems and writings and memories (even a fairy tale I wrote past year 🙂 – Another big hug!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. ✨ ✨ Thanks to you! ✨ ✨ It is a most valuable post and I think it might help a couple of persons I know more or less, that have similar issues or experiences (in the collective of bigender, genderfluid and transgender persons I belong in, DID is not uncommon; much more uncommon, and tougher!, is its association with blindness as it is your case.
    I will reblog the post tomorrow!! Hug and Kisses – Li

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on INVISIBLE FORMS and commented:
    A Guest Post by Carol Anne – This is a deeply touching and most valuable post, and I think it might help a couple of persons I know more or less, that have similar issues or experiences (in the collective of bi-gender, genderfluid and transgender persons I belong in, D.I.D. is not uncommon. Much more uncommon, and much tougher, is its association with blindness as is Carol Anne’s case.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Very interesting–my fiance just ended our relationship after a split to an altered self. It’s been ruinous and trying to cope with the fallout…well, I’m trying very hard to love and forgive her. Thank you for the insight.

    Liked by 1 person

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